Dropbox on Wednesday announced big changes to its Dropbox Pro offering, including more storage space and better sharing options.

The company’s new pricing matches similar moves by Google and Microsoft and makes Dropbox Pro one of the cheapest ways to get a terabyte of storage, though still more expensive than Microsoft OneDrive for Business.

Dropbox is simplifying its tiered pricing structure and offering one Dropbox Pro plan for $9.99 a month or $99 a year that includes 1 terabyte (TB) of storage. Previously, Dropbox Pro offered 100GB for that price of $9.99 a month, 200GB for $19.99 a month and 500GB for $49.99 a month.

So if you’re an existing Dropbox Pro customer, you just got a bunch of extra storage — and if you subscribed to a higher-tiered plan, you’ll get a reduction in monthly bill or a pro-rated refund for your service.

In fact, until now, Dropbox had actually become one of the more expensive services, at least priced per gigabyte.

Google Drive already offers 1TB for $9.99 a month, though without a $99 per year option.Microsoft OneDrive for Business seems to offer the best price for 1TB at $2.50 a month ($30 a year).

Back in June, Apple also announced that it will be drastically improving the storage offerings of its iCloud service to be more competitively aligned with others in the field.

New sharing controls

Simple collaboration is one of the reasons people choose Dropbox Pro, but we’ve heard you ask for more ways to protect the stuff you share. That’s why we’re bringing new sharing controls to Dropbox Pro.

  • Passwords for shared links create an additional layer of security so only people with the password can access your link.
  • Expirations for shared links safeguard your sensitive files by letting you set how long your links stay up.
  • View-only permissions for shared folders let you pick whether recipients can edit or just view files within your shared folder.

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New safeguards for lost devices

Remote wipe lets you delete your Dropbox files from a lost or stolen device while keeping them safely backed up in Dropbox. For example, if you’ve ever left your laptop on a plane, you’re not just worried about the laptop — you’re worried about the stuff that’s on it.

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Source: Mashable.com, Dropbox Blog 

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